Rwanda is turning to electric motorcycles to reduce pollutants

Rwanda Electric Motors Ltd has so far converted roughly 80 motorcycle taxis—the most prevalent mode of public transportation in Kigali—and manufactured another 200 brand-new electric motorcycles for usage.

 
The initiative, which is supported by the Rwandan government and the United Nations Development Programme, is part of a larger national effort to cut carbon dioxide emissions by 16 percent by 2030 and another 38 percent over the next decade.
 
The government abolished import duties on electric and hybrid cars, as well as charging station equipment, in July, claiming that the measure would speed up Rwanda's transition away from fossil fuels and "lower greenhouse gas emissions."
 
Rwanda Electric Motors CEO Donald Kabanda told AFP that his argument to riders was based on the long-term affordability of electric vehicles.
 
He claims that a single electric battery charge may go up to 60 kilometres (37 miles), compared to 35 kilometres for a litre of gasoline. He stated that charging the battery costs roughly 900 Rwandan francs (87 US cents) compared to around 1,000 Rwandan francs for a litre of gas.
 
"So, in terms of economics, there is an advantage for the riders," Kabanda explained.
 
In addition to his company, two Kigali-based firms, Ampersand and Safi Moto, manufacture electric motorcycles, and Volkswagen, the German automaker, began importing electric vehicles in October 2019 for its ride-hailing platform Move.
 
According to the World Bank, Rwanda's GDP per capita is less than $800, putting electric vehicles out of reach for the great majority of the country's 13 million inhabitants.
 
Instead, the government is focusing on public transportation as the primary engine of change. By 2030, the government intends to convert 30% of motorbikes, 20% of buses, and 25% of tiny and micro buses to electric power.
 
However, with few charging stations installed around the country, travelling long distances in electric cars remains difficult, according to Niyorurema, a motorbike taxi driver.
 
"They travel so smoothly and softly in comparison to the petrol motorbikes. The main issue is that they traverse a rather short distance."

Posted on : 05 Oct,2022 | News Source : adqz.co

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